Abstract


  MULTISCALE PROPERTIES OF THE HIGH-RESOLUTION SOLAR CHROMOSPHERE AND IMPLICATIONS FOR IMPULSIVE HEATING

  A. Cadavid, California State University Northridge, ana.cadavid@csun.edu
  J. Lawrence, California State University Northridge, john.lawrence@csun.edu
  D. Christian, California State University Northridge, damian.christian.csun.edu
  D. Jess, Queen's University Belfast , d.jess@qub.ac.uk

We use data from the Hydrogen-Alpha Rapid Dynamics camera (HARDcam) imaging system at the Dunn Solar Telescope in the H band to investigate the scaling properties of intensity fluctuations in the solar chromosphere. We find that for large temporal scales the stochastic component of intensity fluctuations in the vicinity of an active region display prominent multifractal properties. This is consistent with the inherently non-Gaussian characteristics for distributions of incremental time series. We investigate to what degree the multifractality is caused by long range correlations, and how it compares to that of cotemporaneous signals in the corona. A phenomenological model for intensity fluctuations resulting from the successive superposition of impulsive events also displays multifractal properties that qualitatively agree with the high-resolution observations. We propose that the degree of multifractality and the values of the scaling exponents describe real signatures of the underlying physical processes. These criteria can subsequently be used to optimize the parameters of more realistic models attempting to replicate the impulsive heating of the solar chromosphere.