Abstract


  FAN LOOPS OBSERVED BY IRIS, EIS AND AIA

  A. Ghosh., Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics,
  D. Tripathi, Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007, India, durgesh@iucaa.in
  G. Gupta, Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007, India,
  V. Polito, Department of Applied Maths and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA, UK,
  H. Mason, Department of Applied Maths and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA, UK,

Sami K. Solanki

Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, 37077 Göttingen, Germany, solanki-office@mps.mpg.de

Fan loops (formed between 0.6 to 1 MK temperature range) are one of the most complex and longest-living features emanating from the edges of an active region. They play an integral role as conduits of mass and energy amongst the various layers of the solar atmosphere (from the photosphere to the upper corona). Hence, measuring the physical parameters at the points where these are rooted as well as along their length is important. Imaging data from Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) as well as spectroscopic data from EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS) have been used to study the morphology and dynamics of the plasma in these loops. Temporal evolution of loop intensities, densities at the footpoints as well as at coronal heights has been ascertained. To understand the dynamics in the loops, Doppler velocities of the plasma at different temperatures and their temporal evolution at the footpoint have been estimated. In addition, temperature variation along the loop length using the EM loci technique is studied in this work.